War arrows No. 562—7/1, -7/2 and shafts for arrows No. 562—7/3, -7/4 (From left to right). Collector: I. I. Billings. 1790-1792, Alaska. Chugach.

War arrows No. 562—7/1, -7/2 and shafts for arrows No. 562—7/3, -7/4 (From left to right). Collector: I. I. Billings. 1790-1792, Alaska
Collection MAE RAS:
Image ID: 4072588
↑←→↓+--
Title:
War arrows No. 562—7/1, -7/2 and shafts for arrows No. 562—7/3, -7/4 (From left to right). Collector: I. I. Billings. 1790-1792, Alaska
Ethnicity:
Chugach
Commentation:
Material: wood, coppers, sinew, feathers. Dimensions: No. 562—7/1: length 73.5 cm, diameter of the shaft 1.1 cm. Point: length 19.4 cm, width 2.3 cm, thickness of the stalk 0.3 cm No. 562—7/2: length 75 cm, diameter of the shaft 0.9 cm.Point: length 15.5 cm, width 2 cm, thickness of the stalk 0.3 cm No. 562—7/3: length 59 cm, diameter 1 cm No. 562—7/4: length 61.5 cm, diameter 0.9 cm The points of the arrows are made out of copper which bears witness to their age. The ability to work copper by forging was known to the people of Alaska prior to the appearance of the Europeans. It is believed that the first people who learned how to work native copper ore were the Ahtna Indians and the other Native people of Alaska learned these skills from them. The war arrows of the Kodiak Alutiiq people collected by Yu. F. Lisianskii in 1804—1805 had more durable iron points (No. 2890—14, -16).
Google maps:
Wiki: