Maegami-dachi (“Cutting the Forelock”) ceremony. Series “the Life of the Japanese”. Kawahara Keiga.

Maegami-dachi (“Cutting the Forelock”) ceremony. Series “the Life of the Japanese”
Collection MAE RAS: № 13-34/39(4)
Image ID: 1241938310
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Museum inventory number:
№ 13-34/39(4)
Title:
Maegami-dachi (“Cutting the Forelock”) ceremony. Series “the Life of the Japanese”
Author:
Kawahara Keiga
Dating:
1820s
Location:
Japan
Materials:
silk textile, Japanese watercolours, ink, golden powder, Japanese washigami paper, glue
Technics:
painting on silk
Dimensions, cm:
35.0 × 43.5
Collector:
Siebold, von Philipp Frantz
Commentation:
The ritual cutting of the forelock was performed on young men between the ages of 13 and 17 (the age varied depending on region). This ritual was also called "The First Tying Up of the Hair." The forelock was left uncut during a boy’s childhood. When he was grown up, his forehead was shaved, marking him as an adult man. He is now considered a grownup and has to wear the costume and take on the appearance of an adult man. Since this ritual marked a young man’s passage into adulthood, it was one of the most important moments in his life. To underline the importance of the ritual, symbols of long life, good fortune and happiness are placed in front of the alcove (tokonoma). These symbols included a folding suehiro fan to which a bundle of his boyish hair was attached, lobsters, four or five-color rice pies goshiki, and dumplings in the shape of peaches. A painting of Fukurokuju (one of the seven gods of good fortune) was hung in the alcove.